This site brings together the publications of Dr. Sara Niner about people & politics in Timor-Leste.

19 September, 2010

Convite/Invite ba Lecture Publico ba Dr. Sara Niner: OINSA BARLAKE MUDA IHA TIMOR LESTE? Is barlake changing in Timor-Leste?

Konvite: ema hotu-hotu bemvindo
Invite: Everyone welcome
Lecture Publico ba Dr. Sara Niner, Monash University
OINSA BARLAKE MUDA IHA TIMOR LESTE?
Is barlake changing in Timor-Leste?
Haksesuk depois ba panel Timor Oan
Followed by discussion from Timorese panel.
Favour ida foti planu ba parte no troka
Please bring your ideas for input and exchange.
Sesta-Feira 24 Septembro 11.00am
Peace Centre
Universidade Timor-Leste (UNTL)
Kaikoli Campus
(Next to Obrigado Barraks)
Summario
Hadiak balun ba situasaun ida ne’e, ba maioria feto sira tem ke halo liu husi pratika sira hanesan barlake. Investigasaun ida oinsa barlake muda no oinsa nia afeta ba feto sira nia moris no sira nia familia bele asiste iha hetan solusaun ba impaktu negativu balun. Ho rasaun ida ne’e, ohin loron iha mudansa signifikante iha Timor Leste. Barlake mos sai hanesan objektu de atake ida ba feto activista sira tamba nia afeta feto sira nia moris. Ohin loron, kritisismu sentral maka, barlake sai tiha ona nu’udar “noeiva nia folin” deit,  ne’ebe halo ita hare hanesan feto no nia fertilidade selu tiha ona no trata feto hanesan produtu ida. Investigasaun ida oinsa barlake muda no oinsa nia afeta ba feto sira nia moris no sira nia familia bele asiste iha hetan solusaun ba impaktu negativu balun.
Any significant improvements to the lives of the majority of women In Timor-Leste must be made through an engagement with indigenous customary practices like barlake. Yet the complexity and variability of barlake systems is little documented and research about its everyday impact on women’s lives is sorely inadequate for this purpose. There are significant changes to barlake in Timor-Leste today. Barlake has also come under attack from the modern women’s movement because of the way it affects the lives of women. The main criticism today is that an uneven exchange of goods, favoring the bride’s family, encourages the perception that women and their fertility are being bought and subsequently treated as a commodity. An investigation of how practices are changing and the effects on the lives of men and women may assist in finding solutions to some of these negative impacts.

2 comments:

  1. A very important topic Sara.
    Did you hear the story about the Australian woman who in 2008 sought court approval to adopt an infant Timorese girl, whose teenage mother had been deserted by her boyfriend during the girl's pregnancy. Nuns had been caring for the infant, whose mother was happy with the terms agreed for an adoption.
    All were astonished when the ex-boyfriend's brother turned up at the court house – demanding compensation for his family’s ‘lost’ bride-price!
    Apparently this objection was given short shrift by the Timorese judge, who promptly approved the adoption.

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  2. Yes there are all sorts of strange modern dynamics to these customary practices. This one sounds driven by opportunism and greed rather than customary obligations. But these sort of things are common now.

    I can't tell who this is so excuse me for not acknowledging you if I know you.

    best wishes sara

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